...needs more ketchup
the king herself
...needs more ketchup
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preludetowind:

"Many of my movies have strong female leads - brave, self-sufficient girls that don’t think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart. They’ll need a friend, or a supporter, but never a savior. Any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man." - Hayao Miyazaki
preludetowind:

"Many of my movies have strong female leads - brave, self-sufficient girls that don’t think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart. They’ll need a friend, or a supporter, but never a savior. Any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man." - Hayao Miyazaki
preludetowind:

"Many of my movies have strong female leads - brave, self-sufficient girls that don’t think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart. They’ll need a friend, or a supporter, but never a savior. Any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man." - Hayao Miyazaki
preludetowind:

"Many of my movies have strong female leads - brave, self-sufficient girls that don’t think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart. They’ll need a friend, or a supporter, but never a savior. Any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man." - Hayao Miyazaki
preludetowind:

"Many of my movies have strong female leads - brave, self-sufficient girls that don’t think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart. They’ll need a friend, or a supporter, but never a savior. Any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man." - Hayao Miyazaki
preludetowind:

"Many of my movies have strong female leads - brave, self-sufficient girls that don’t think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart. They’ll need a friend, or a supporter, but never a savior. Any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man." - Hayao Miyazaki
preludetowind:

"Many of my movies have strong female leads - brave, self-sufficient girls that don’t think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart. They’ll need a friend, or a supporter, but never a savior. Any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man." - Hayao Miyazaki
preludetowind:

"Many of my movies have strong female leads - brave, self-sufficient girls that don’t think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart. They’ll need a friend, or a supporter, but never a savior. Any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man." - Hayao Miyazaki
preludetowind:

"Many of my movies have strong female leads - brave, self-sufficient girls that don’t think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart. They’ll need a friend, or a supporter, but never a savior. Any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man." - Hayao Miyazaki
preludetowind:

"Many of my movies have strong female leads - brave, self-sufficient girls that don’t think twice about fighting for what they believe in with all their heart. They’ll need a friend, or a supporter, but never a savior. Any woman is just as capable of being a hero as any man." - Hayao Miyazaki
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somethingfeline:

batwitch:

Stills from the new Live Action film of Kiki’s Delivery Service (source)
Kiki’s Mother’s workshop is a dream! 

…. live action Kiki!

SAAAYYY whaatt
somethingfeline:

batwitch:

Stills from the new Live Action film of Kiki’s Delivery Service (source)
Kiki’s Mother’s workshop is a dream! 

…. live action Kiki!

SAAAYYY whaatt
+
sinobug:

Katydid Nymph (Olcinia or Sathrophyllia sp., Cymatomerini, Pseudophyllinae, Tettigonidae)  by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  See more Chinese grasshoppers and crickets on my Flickr site HERE…..

HOLY BUGporn.  SOOOO PRETTY
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theolduvaigorge:

Skull Suggests Single Human Species Emerged From Africa, Not Several

Well-Preserved Find 1.8 Million Years Old Drastically Simplifies Evolutionary Picture

by Robert Lee Hotz
"A newly discovered 1.8 million-year-old skull offers evidence that humanity’s early ancestors emerged from Africa as a single adventurous species, not several species as believed, drastically simplifying human evolution, an international research team said Thursday.
The skull—the most complete of its kind ever discovered—is “a really extraordinary find,” said paleoanthropologist Marcia Ponce de Leon at the University of Zurich’s Anthropological Institute and Museum, who helped analyze it. “It is in a perfectly preserved state.”
Unearthed at Dmanisi in Georgia—an ancient route in the Caucasus for the first human migrations out of Africa—the skull was found at a spot where partial fossils of four other similar individuals and a scattering of crude stone tools had been found several years ago. They all date from a time when the area was a humid forest where saber-tooth tigers and giant cheetahs prowled. Preserved in siltstone beneath the hilltop ruins of a medieval fortress, the remains are the earliest known human fossils outside Africa, experts said.
David Lordkipanidze, director of the Georgian National Museum, who led the team, reported the discovery in Science. The primitive skull was first uncovered on Aug. 5, 2005—his birthday. “It was a very nice present,” he said.
Taken together, the finds at Dmanisi are especially important because experts in evolution could analyze the physical differences between individuals living in the same place at the same time almost 2 million years ago, when humankind first emerged from Africa to people the world, according to Yale University anthropologist Andrew Hill.
"It gives you a chance to look at variation for the first time," said Dr. Hill, who was not involved in the discovery" (read more).
***Hmm. I need to read the study ASAP.
(Source: Wall Street Journal)
theolduvaigorge:

Skull Suggests Single Human Species Emerged From Africa, Not Several

Well-Preserved Find 1.8 Million Years Old Drastically Simplifies Evolutionary Picture

by Robert Lee Hotz
"A newly discovered 1.8 million-year-old skull offers evidence that humanity’s early ancestors emerged from Africa as a single adventurous species, not several species as believed, drastically simplifying human evolution, an international research team said Thursday.
The skull—the most complete of its kind ever discovered—is “a really extraordinary find,” said paleoanthropologist Marcia Ponce de Leon at the University of Zurich’s Anthropological Institute and Museum, who helped analyze it. “It is in a perfectly preserved state.”
Unearthed at Dmanisi in Georgia—an ancient route in the Caucasus for the first human migrations out of Africa—the skull was found at a spot where partial fossils of four other similar individuals and a scattering of crude stone tools had been found several years ago. They all date from a time when the area was a humid forest where saber-tooth tigers and giant cheetahs prowled. Preserved in siltstone beneath the hilltop ruins of a medieval fortress, the remains are the earliest known human fossils outside Africa, experts said.
David Lordkipanidze, director of the Georgian National Museum, who led the team, reported the discovery in Science. The primitive skull was first uncovered on Aug. 5, 2005—his birthday. “It was a very nice present,” he said.
Taken together, the finds at Dmanisi are especially important because experts in evolution could analyze the physical differences between individuals living in the same place at the same time almost 2 million years ago, when humankind first emerged from Africa to people the world, according to Yale University anthropologist Andrew Hill.
"It gives you a chance to look at variation for the first time," said Dr. Hill, who was not involved in the discovery" (read more).
***Hmm. I need to read the study ASAP.
(Source: Wall Street Journal)
theolduvaigorge:

Skull Suggests Single Human Species Emerged From Africa, Not Several

Well-Preserved Find 1.8 Million Years Old Drastically Simplifies Evolutionary Picture

by Robert Lee Hotz
"A newly discovered 1.8 million-year-old skull offers evidence that humanity’s early ancestors emerged from Africa as a single adventurous species, not several species as believed, drastically simplifying human evolution, an international research team said Thursday.
The skull—the most complete of its kind ever discovered—is “a really extraordinary find,” said paleoanthropologist Marcia Ponce de Leon at the University of Zurich’s Anthropological Institute and Museum, who helped analyze it. “It is in a perfectly preserved state.”
Unearthed at Dmanisi in Georgia—an ancient route in the Caucasus for the first human migrations out of Africa—the skull was found at a spot where partial fossils of four other similar individuals and a scattering of crude stone tools had been found several years ago. They all date from a time when the area was a humid forest where saber-tooth tigers and giant cheetahs prowled. Preserved in siltstone beneath the hilltop ruins of a medieval fortress, the remains are the earliest known human fossils outside Africa, experts said.
David Lordkipanidze, director of the Georgian National Museum, who led the team, reported the discovery in Science. The primitive skull was first uncovered on Aug. 5, 2005—his birthday. “It was a very nice present,” he said.
Taken together, the finds at Dmanisi are especially important because experts in evolution could analyze the physical differences between individuals living in the same place at the same time almost 2 million years ago, when humankind first emerged from Africa to people the world, according to Yale University anthropologist Andrew Hill.
"It gives you a chance to look at variation for the first time," said Dr. Hill, who was not involved in the discovery" (read more).
***Hmm. I need to read the study ASAP.
(Source: Wall Street Journal)
theolduvaigorge:

Skull Suggests Single Human Species Emerged From Africa, Not Several

Well-Preserved Find 1.8 Million Years Old Drastically Simplifies Evolutionary Picture

by Robert Lee Hotz
"A newly discovered 1.8 million-year-old skull offers evidence that humanity’s early ancestors emerged from Africa as a single adventurous species, not several species as believed, drastically simplifying human evolution, an international research team said Thursday.
The skull—the most complete of its kind ever discovered—is “a really extraordinary find,” said paleoanthropologist Marcia Ponce de Leon at the University of Zurich’s Anthropological Institute and Museum, who helped analyze it. “It is in a perfectly preserved state.”
Unearthed at Dmanisi in Georgia—an ancient route in the Caucasus for the first human migrations out of Africa—the skull was found at a spot where partial fossils of four other similar individuals and a scattering of crude stone tools had been found several years ago. They all date from a time when the area was a humid forest where saber-tooth tigers and giant cheetahs prowled. Preserved in siltstone beneath the hilltop ruins of a medieval fortress, the remains are the earliest known human fossils outside Africa, experts said.
David Lordkipanidze, director of the Georgian National Museum, who led the team, reported the discovery in Science. The primitive skull was first uncovered on Aug. 5, 2005—his birthday. “It was a very nice present,” he said.
Taken together, the finds at Dmanisi are especially important because experts in evolution could analyze the physical differences between individuals living in the same place at the same time almost 2 million years ago, when humankind first emerged from Africa to people the world, according to Yale University anthropologist Andrew Hill.
"It gives you a chance to look at variation for the first time," said Dr. Hill, who was not involved in the discovery" (read more).
***Hmm. I need to read the study ASAP.
(Source: Wall Street Journal)
+
katyfarina:

jezfez81:

buzzfeedgeeky:

Advice from some kick-ass ladies [more here]

I really need this right now.

#i don’t understand the one about the worst artist in the room fully but i guess it has to do about being open to learning new things?
Well, it’s not just about that. 
It’s about humility, being humble, and constantly challenging yourself. Being “The Best Artist In The Room” is boring. You stop improving because you stop feeling the need to improve. You stop working hard because no one is ‘better’ then you. I think if you’re “The Best Artist In The Room”, your ego goes out of control, and arrogance doesn’t beget anyone, let alone creatives.
But it really is mostly about challenging yourself constantly and constantly working to improve. It’s about being around a community where you not only feel challenged by others, but others feel challenged by you. It’s a great thing when you can develop a community where you all challenge each other.
That’s why I always loved (and really miss!) artists’ alleys. I never felt like The Best Artist In The Room, there was always someone who’s technique and skill level I valued as ‘superior’ to mine, and it made me think about how I approached my art. Other artists would come up to me and tell me the same thing. I can’t believe how many talented individuals who’s artwork I valued as somehow greater then my own would say the same thing to me, about my art.
I think it’s really important never to be a big fish in a small pond. I think it’s really important to push your limits and challenge yourself and surround yourself with people you admire, not admirers. 
katyfarina:

jezfez81:

buzzfeedgeeky:

Advice from some kick-ass ladies [more here]

I really need this right now.

#i don’t understand the one about the worst artist in the room fully but i guess it has to do about being open to learning new things?
Well, it’s not just about that. 
It’s about humility, being humble, and constantly challenging yourself. Being “The Best Artist In The Room” is boring. You stop improving because you stop feeling the need to improve. You stop working hard because no one is ‘better’ then you. I think if you’re “The Best Artist In The Room”, your ego goes out of control, and arrogance doesn’t beget anyone, let alone creatives.
But it really is mostly about challenging yourself constantly and constantly working to improve. It’s about being around a community where you not only feel challenged by others, but others feel challenged by you. It’s a great thing when you can develop a community where you all challenge each other.
That’s why I always loved (and really miss!) artists’ alleys. I never felt like The Best Artist In The Room, there was always someone who’s technique and skill level I valued as ‘superior’ to mine, and it made me think about how I approached my art. Other artists would come up to me and tell me the same thing. I can’t believe how many talented individuals who’s artwork I valued as somehow greater then my own would say the same thing to me, about my art.
I think it’s really important never to be a big fish in a small pond. I think it’s really important to push your limits and challenge yourself and surround yourself with people you admire, not admirers. 
katyfarina:

jezfez81:

buzzfeedgeeky:

Advice from some kick-ass ladies [more here]

I really need this right now.

#i don’t understand the one about the worst artist in the room fully but i guess it has to do about being open to learning new things?
Well, it’s not just about that. 
It’s about humility, being humble, and constantly challenging yourself. Being “The Best Artist In The Room” is boring. You stop improving because you stop feeling the need to improve. You stop working hard because no one is ‘better’ then you. I think if you’re “The Best Artist In The Room”, your ego goes out of control, and arrogance doesn’t beget anyone, let alone creatives.
But it really is mostly about challenging yourself constantly and constantly working to improve. It’s about being around a community where you not only feel challenged by others, but others feel challenged by you. It’s a great thing when you can develop a community where you all challenge each other.
That’s why I always loved (and really miss!) artists’ alleys. I never felt like The Best Artist In The Room, there was always someone who’s technique and skill level I valued as ‘superior’ to mine, and it made me think about how I approached my art. Other artists would come up to me and tell me the same thing. I can’t believe how many talented individuals who’s artwork I valued as somehow greater then my own would say the same thing to me, about my art.
I think it’s really important never to be a big fish in a small pond. I think it’s really important to push your limits and challenge yourself and surround yourself with people you admire, not admirers. 
katyfarina:

jezfez81:

buzzfeedgeeky:

Advice from some kick-ass ladies [more here]

I really need this right now.

#i don’t understand the one about the worst artist in the room fully but i guess it has to do about being open to learning new things?
Well, it’s not just about that. 
It’s about humility, being humble, and constantly challenging yourself. Being “The Best Artist In The Room” is boring. You stop improving because you stop feeling the need to improve. You stop working hard because no one is ‘better’ then you. I think if you’re “The Best Artist In The Room”, your ego goes out of control, and arrogance doesn’t beget anyone, let alone creatives.
But it really is mostly about challenging yourself constantly and constantly working to improve. It’s about being around a community where you not only feel challenged by others, but others feel challenged by you. It’s a great thing when you can develop a community where you all challenge each other.
That’s why I always loved (and really miss!) artists’ alleys. I never felt like The Best Artist In The Room, there was always someone who’s technique and skill level I valued as ‘superior’ to mine, and it made me think about how I approached my art. Other artists would come up to me and tell me the same thing. I can’t believe how many talented individuals who’s artwork I valued as somehow greater then my own would say the same thing to me, about my art.
I think it’s really important never to be a big fish in a small pond. I think it’s really important to push your limits and challenge yourself and surround yourself with people you admire, not admirers. 
katyfarina:

jezfez81:

buzzfeedgeeky:

Advice from some kick-ass ladies [more here]

I really need this right now.

#i don’t understand the one about the worst artist in the room fully but i guess it has to do about being open to learning new things?
Well, it’s not just about that. 
It’s about humility, being humble, and constantly challenging yourself. Being “The Best Artist In The Room” is boring. You stop improving because you stop feeling the need to improve. You stop working hard because no one is ‘better’ then you. I think if you’re “The Best Artist In The Room”, your ego goes out of control, and arrogance doesn’t beget anyone, let alone creatives.
But it really is mostly about challenging yourself constantly and constantly working to improve. It’s about being around a community where you not only feel challenged by others, but others feel challenged by you. It’s a great thing when you can develop a community where you all challenge each other.
That’s why I always loved (and really miss!) artists’ alleys. I never felt like The Best Artist In The Room, there was always someone who’s technique and skill level I valued as ‘superior’ to mine, and it made me think about how I approached my art. Other artists would come up to me and tell me the same thing. I can’t believe how many talented individuals who’s artwork I valued as somehow greater then my own would say the same thing to me, about my art.
I think it’s really important never to be a big fish in a small pond. I think it’s really important to push your limits and challenge yourself and surround yourself with people you admire, not admirers. 
katyfarina:

jezfez81:

buzzfeedgeeky:

Advice from some kick-ass ladies [more here]

I really need this right now.

#i don’t understand the one about the worst artist in the room fully but i guess it has to do about being open to learning new things?
Well, it’s not just about that. 
It’s about humility, being humble, and constantly challenging yourself. Being “The Best Artist In The Room” is boring. You stop improving because you stop feeling the need to improve. You stop working hard because no one is ‘better’ then you. I think if you’re “The Best Artist In The Room”, your ego goes out of control, and arrogance doesn’t beget anyone, let alone creatives.
But it really is mostly about challenging yourself constantly and constantly working to improve. It’s about being around a community where you not only feel challenged by others, but others feel challenged by you. It’s a great thing when you can develop a community where you all challenge each other.
That’s why I always loved (and really miss!) artists’ alleys. I never felt like The Best Artist In The Room, there was always someone who’s technique and skill level I valued as ‘superior’ to mine, and it made me think about how I approached my art. Other artists would come up to me and tell me the same thing. I can’t believe how many talented individuals who’s artwork I valued as somehow greater then my own would say the same thing to me, about my art.
I think it’s really important never to be a big fish in a small pond. I think it’s really important to push your limits and challenge yourself and surround yourself with people you admire, not admirers. 
katyfarina:

jezfez81:

buzzfeedgeeky:

Advice from some kick-ass ladies [more here]

I really need this right now.

#i don’t understand the one about the worst artist in the room fully but i guess it has to do about being open to learning new things?
Well, it’s not just about that. 
It’s about humility, being humble, and constantly challenging yourself. Being “The Best Artist In The Room” is boring. You stop improving because you stop feeling the need to improve. You stop working hard because no one is ‘better’ then you. I think if you’re “The Best Artist In The Room”, your ego goes out of control, and arrogance doesn’t beget anyone, let alone creatives.
But it really is mostly about challenging yourself constantly and constantly working to improve. It’s about being around a community where you not only feel challenged by others, but others feel challenged by you. It’s a great thing when you can develop a community where you all challenge each other.
That’s why I always loved (and really miss!) artists’ alleys. I never felt like The Best Artist In The Room, there was always someone who’s technique and skill level I valued as ‘superior’ to mine, and it made me think about how I approached my art. Other artists would come up to me and tell me the same thing. I can’t believe how many talented individuals who’s artwork I valued as somehow greater then my own would say the same thing to me, about my art.
I think it’s really important never to be a big fish in a small pond. I think it’s really important to push your limits and challenge yourself and surround yourself with people you admire, not admirers. 
katyfarina:

jezfez81:

buzzfeedgeeky:

Advice from some kick-ass ladies [more here]

I really need this right now.

#i don’t understand the one about the worst artist in the room fully but i guess it has to do about being open to learning new things?
Well, it’s not just about that. 
It’s about humility, being humble, and constantly challenging yourself. Being “The Best Artist In The Room” is boring. You stop improving because you stop feeling the need to improve. You stop working hard because no one is ‘better’ then you. I think if you’re “The Best Artist In The Room”, your ego goes out of control, and arrogance doesn’t beget anyone, let alone creatives.
But it really is mostly about challenging yourself constantly and constantly working to improve. It’s about being around a community where you not only feel challenged by others, but others feel challenged by you. It’s a great thing when you can develop a community where you all challenge each other.
That’s why I always loved (and really miss!) artists’ alleys. I never felt like The Best Artist In The Room, there was always someone who’s technique and skill level I valued as ‘superior’ to mine, and it made me think about how I approached my art. Other artists would come up to me and tell me the same thing. I can’t believe how many talented individuals who’s artwork I valued as somehow greater then my own would say the same thing to me, about my art.
I think it’s really important never to be a big fish in a small pond. I think it’s really important to push your limits and challenge yourself and surround yourself with people you admire, not admirers.